the Roaring Twenties

                                                  Bouffi       Zouzou   Boudu   Photon    Colleter


The choice of bass guitar as my favorite instrument dates back to my high school years, years of effervescence and boiling where I studied chemistry and sometimes alchemy. The 1971-1973 vintage from the technical school in Le Havre had colorful characters. Banane, Bebert and I were going to make unforgettable encounters. The first one I quickly got to know was Zouzou de Fécamp (Yves), free jazz drummer or rock singer depending on the mood. If he did not stay in high school for very long because he continued to study, he is nevertheless one of my oldest friends from my youth. Bouffi immediately follows, also from Fécamp (Jean-Jacques), with whom we had a good time of laughter and all kinds of jokes. The two lads, interns at the school, introduced me to the one who communicated his passion for bass to me. I mean Boudu, not saved from the waters but of Bolbec, an eminent borough of Seine-Maritime. I don't remember his first name, maybe Didier? In short, by a magic trick that I cannot explain to myself, the fellow with long light hair spoke to me about this musical instrument, the bass, in a manner so religious and so solemn, that I converted without further delay. Soon we all share the same admiration for these avant-garde French groups where the bass plays a preponderant role and no longer has anything to envy guitarists and other keyboard players. It was the great Martin Circus of Act II (with Bob Brault on bass) or the group Magma (Christian Vander, Jannick Top, Claude Engel or even Didier Lockwood), which I saw in concert at that time but I no longer remember where ...

With the few savings from a summer job, I bought my first bass guitar, an Aria, all white. I start tapping like crazy his four strings, drawing inspiration from a method just as forbidding as the music theory of schoolchildren (you no doubt remember the piping sessions that our school teachers imposed on us, persuaded to do to be born of future vocations). The problem with the bass that you don't have with the acoustic guitar is that without an amplifier you can't hear anything at all. Poor at the time, I persevered in my apprenticeship and stuck the bass neck against the doors of an old Norman cabinet, acting as a sound box. By listening carefully, it was finally possible for me to perceive the sweet sound of Sol, D, A but a little less that of E. I had for any teacher only the 33 rpm records of my favorite bass players, those cited above soon joined by Jack Bruce (Cream) and Chris Squire (Yes) and that I listened to on repeat. A strong desire to play with other musicians was soon felt and one summer walking along the beach promenade of Le Havre, I met Lionel who suggested that I be part of his group, whose name must have been Sigma if I am not mistaken. not. Certainly a ballroom orchestra, far from my musical tastes at the time, but I had everything to learn in music. The rest is another story to discover with Orejona then Cecile ...